Downloads

This page provides links to free downloads for useful information from external sites. Electrical Regulations, Renewable Energy Regulations,  Electrical Standards, Renewable Energy Standards.

Electricity at Work Regulations 1989

Electricity at Work

Safe Working Practices

GS38 Electrical Test Equipment

Electrical Safety & You

Maintaining Portable Electrical Equipment

Relevant to all work activities and premises except mines, quarries, certain offshore installations and particular ships. Intended to assist dutyholders in meeting the regulatory requirements, it will be of interest and practical help primarily to engineers (including those involved in design, construction, operation or maintenance of electrical systems and equipment), technicians and their managers.

This book gives guidance on the key elements that need to be considered when devising safe working practices for people who carry out work on or near electrical equipment. It includes advice that is relevant to managers and supervisors who control or influence the design, specification, selection, installation, commissioning, maintenance or operation of electrical equipment


This guidance is for electrically competent people including electricians, electrical contractors, test supervisors, technicians, managers and/or appliance retailers.  The Electricity at Work Regulations 1989 require those in control of all or part of an electrical system to ensure it is safe to use and maintained. This document provides advice and guidance on how to achieve this.  It offers advice in the selection and use of:

test probes,  leads,  lamps,  voltage indicating devices &
measuring equipment for circuits with rated voltages not exceeding 650V.

This leaflet outlines basic electrical safety measures to help you control the risks from your use of electricity at work. The revised version clarifies the advice on maintaining portable electric equipment in low-risk environments.There is also guidance on:the main hazards associated with working with electricity
how to carry out a risk assessment
how you can reduce risks.
The leaflet gives details of other useful HSE guidance documents.

It's a myth that all portable electrical appliances in a low-risk environment, such as an office, need to have a portable appliance test (PAT) every year. The law simply requires employers to ensure electrical equipment is maintained in order to prevent danger - it doesn't state what needs to be done or how often.

This revised leaflet explains the simple and sensible precautions that need to be taken to prevent danger from portable or movable electrical equipment in low-risk environments such as offices, shops, some parts of hotels and residential care homes.

 

It also provides examples of this sort of equipment to help you to decide what you need to do to maintain portable appliances in your workplace.

Management of Health and Safety at Work

A Guide for Connecting Generation that falls under G59/2

Guidance on the regulatory specifics, so providing a bedrock reference for good practice. The Regulations deal both with over-arching aspects and the more circumstantial matters relating to the human nature of the subject. Accordingly, generally issues such as basic health and safety arrangements and assistance, health surveillance, risk assessment, principles of prevention plus procedures for serious and imminent danger are addressed.

Thus details relating to temporary workers, those in host employers’ or self employed persons’ undertakings, expectant mothers and young persons are encompassed, as are those of employee duties and training requirements. Colour-coded to enable easy distinction between texts pertaining to the Regulations, the Approved Code and additional guidance.

This Guide is intended to help you, as a developer of any form of Distributed Generation, to connect your generating plant to one of the UK’s electricity distribution networks. The types of generation that most frequently connect to the distribution networks include:
renewable energy schemes; waste to energy schemes; and
on-site generation and Combined Heat and Power (CHP) schemes. VERSION 3.3 

A Guide for Connecting Generation that falls under G83/1

Stage 1

This Guide is intended to help you, as an owner or developer of Distributed Generation, to connect your generating plant to one of the UK’s electricity distribution networks. The types of generation that most frequently connect to the distribution networks include renewable energy schemes (e.g. photo voltaic and wind) and Combined Heat and Power (CHP) schemes. VERSION 3.3

A Guide for Connecting Generation that falls under G83/1 Stage 2

This Guide is intended to help you, as an owner or developer of Distributed Generation, to connect your generating plant to one of the UK’s electricity distribution networks. The types of generation that most frequently connect to the distribution networks include renewable energy schemes (e.g. photo voltaic and wind) and Combined Heat and Power (CHP) schemes. VERSION 3.3

Application forms for Notification to DNO

National Terms of Connection

This link take you to the Uk Power Networks site where you can find guidance and assistance on the type of application you should be making as well as application forms which may be downloaded from there.

DTI Guide To 

Photovoltaics 

In Buildings

This Document has now been superceded by:  The ECA Guide To The Installation Of Photvoltaic Systems, but may still be downloaded for reference purposes.

PV Installers courses in Birmingham, PV Training in Birmingham

ECA

Guide To The Installation Of 

Photvoltaic Systems

This document replaces the DTI Guide To Photovoltaics In Buildings.  The scope of this document is to supply system installers with information to ensure that a mains-connected PV system meets current UK standards and best practice recommendations. It is primarily aimed at small-scale installations (less than 16A per phase, as per the scope of ER G83/1).

RISK ASSESSMENT

A Brief Guide To Controlling Risks In The Work Place

This document will show you How to assess the risks in your workplace broken down into the following areas:

 

  • Identify the hazards

  • Decide who might be harmed and how

  • Evaluate the risks and decide on precautions

  • Record your significant findings

  • Review your assessment and update if necessary

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